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 New,Composing with Constraints: 100 Practical Exercises in Music Composition

  • Composer: Variego, Jorge

Book

$25.25

Out of stock at the UK distributor

You may order it now but please be aware that it may be six weeks or more before it can be despatched

Contents

  • Introduction
  • How to use the book
  • Recommendations for the instructor
  • Chapter I - Melody (exercises 1 - 20)
  • Preliminary notes
  • Melody 1 - focal point
  • Melody 2 - using your own scale
  • Melody 3 - using your own scale and a subset
  • Melody 4 - using your own scale with a substitute pitch
  • Melody 5 - a scale in a given order
  • Melody 6 - a scale in a given order with ordered rhythm
  • Melody 7 - concatenating triads
  • Melody 8 - concatenating triads of any type
  • Melody 9 - segments of equal duration
  • Melody 10 - segments of unequal duration
  • Melody 11 - the melody of an image
  • Melody 12 - integer notation
  • Melody 13 - integer notation collections and subsets
  • Melody 14 - integer notation collections and transition subsets
  • Melody 15 - simple probabilities
  • Melody 16 - a twelve-tone row
  • Melody 17 - a twelve-tone row in palindrome
  • Melody 18 - intervallic content
  • Melody 19 - leitmotifs
  • Melody 20 - eliminations
  • Chapter II - Harmony (exercises 21 - 40)
  • Preliminary notes
  • Harmony 21 - composing transitions
  • Harmony 22 - using segments, melody becomes harmony
  • Harmony 23 - axis of symmetry Harmony 24 - using the harmonic series
  • Harmony 25 - using the harmonic series with a pedal tone
  • Harmony 26 - just triads
  • Harmony 27 - using integer notation
  • Harmony 28 - diatonic?
  • Harmony 29 - a twelve-tone row
  • Harmony 30 - alla circle progression
  • Harmony 31 - triads that move in thirds
  • Harmony 32 - triads that move in thirds and progressions within a progression
  • Harmony 33 - polychords, triads over triads
  • Harmony 34 - polytonality
  • Harmony 35 - pedal tones
  • Harmony 36 - ideas using parallel modes
  • Harmony 37 - clusters
  • Harmony 38 - sequences and patterns
  • Harmony 39 - implied harmonies
  • Harmony 40 - contrafacts
  • Chapter III - Rhythm (exercises 41 - 60)
  • Preliminary notes
  • Rhythm 41 - transformations using simple math
  • Rhythm 42 - using segments
  • Rhythm 43 - using segments per measure
  • Rhythm 44 - non-retrogradable rhythms
  • Rhythm 45 - patterns within patterns
  • Rhythm 46 - extracting the rhythm of a text
  • Rhythm 47 - why meter?
  • Rhythm 48 - short, long, long, short - using Morse code
  • Rhythm 49 - ostinato
  • Rhythm 50 - playing with hemiolas
  • Rhythm 51 - hemiolas and melodic construction
  • Rhythm 52 - polymeter
  • Rhythm 53 - metric modulations
  • Rhythm 54 - using rhythmic motifs
  • Rhythm 55 - motivic displacement
  • Rhythm 56 - isorhythmic motets, talea and color
  • Rhythm 57 - repeat signs, loops and internal spiraling
  • Rhythm 58 - composing with unequal rests and pauses
  • Rhythm 59 - eliminations, everything coming from the same tune
  • Rhythm 60 - perceivable and non-perceivable pulse
  • Chapter IV - Texture (exercises 61 - 80)
  • Preliminary notes
  • Texture 61 - analyzing Chopin
  • Texture 62 - homorrythmic
  • Texture 63 - leitmotifs
  • Texture 64 - all the same but different
  • Texture 65 - phasing
  • Texture 66 - analyzing Debussy, plaining
  • Texture 67 - Liszt, simple harmonies, complex texture
  • Texture 68 - ostinatos
  • Texture 69 - letting the performer make decisions
  • Texture 70 - aleatoric counterpoint
  • Texture 71 - micropoliphony
  • Texture 72 - counterpoint, appropriating from Fux's species
  • Texture 73 - counterpoint tree
  • 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and others combined
  • Texture 74 - same chord, different color (orchestration)
  • Texture 75 - the magic of the unison and timbral modulation
  • Texture 76 - volume of orchestration
  • Texture 77 - text painting, representing text with sounds
  • Texture 78 - heterophony
  • Texture 79 - using stratified layers alla Ives
  • Texture 80 - sound masses
  • Chapter V - Form (exercises 81 - 90)
  • Form 81 - planning contrast
  • Form 82 - composing with modules
  • Form 83 - the one-way-trip composition, developing variations
  • Form 84 - theme and variations
  • Form 85 - spinning around A, rondo?
  • Form 86 - form as process, minimalism
  • Form 87 - palindromic structures
  • Form 88 - available forms alla Brown
  • Form 89 - monolithic structures
  • Form 90 - game pieces
  • Chapter VI - Pre-compositional strategies (exercises 91 - 100)
  • Starting a new composition. Challenges and possible solutions.
  • Strategies.
  • Formal plans.
  • Using matrices.
  • Analysis and stylistic imitation.
  • Improvisation.
  • Soundscapes and nature.
  • Using the computer as assistant.
  • Pre-composition 91 - writing a compositional recipe
  • Pre-composition 92 - using a matrix
  • Pre-composition 93 - deconstructing and reconstructing I
  • Pre-composition 94 - deconstructing and reconstructing II
  • Pre-composition 95 - transcribing your own improvisations
  • Pre-composition 96 - bringing ideas from other worlds to your music
  • Pre-composition 97 - quotations as triggers
  • Pre-composition 98 - drawing sketches
  • Pre-composition 99 - oblique strategies by Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt
  • Pre-composition 100 - the computer as assistant
  • Appendix
  • A) Grading rubric
  • B) Sample curriculums for group composition classes or individual lessons
  • C) Select anthology of scales and musical examples
  • D) Table of instrument ranges and transpositions