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 Pre-order,The Oxford Handbook of the Operatic Canon

  • Editor: Newark, Cormac
  • Editor: Weber, William

Book

$155.50

Due for release on 10th Dec 2020

Order now and we will deliver it when available

Contents

  • Note to the reader
  • Contributors
  • Acknowledgements
  • General Introduction
  • Idiosyncrasies of the operatic canon
  • Cormac Newark and William Weber
  • Part 1. History, geography
  • Introduction to Chapters 1 and 2
  • Foundations: France and Italy in the eighteenth century
  • Michel Noiray and Franco Piperno
  • Chapater 1.The practical and symbolic functions of pre-Rameau opera at the Paris Opera before Gluck
  • Michel Noiray
  • Chapter 2.Italian opera and the concept of canon in the late eighteenth century
  • Franco Piperno
  • Introduction to Chapters 3 and 4
  • From royal authority to public taste in Berlin, 1740-1815
  • John Mangum and Katherine Hambridge
  • Chapter 3. The repertory of the Italian Court Opera in Berlin, 1740-1786
  • John Mangum
  • Chapter 4.Catching up and getting ahead: The opera house as temple of art in Berlin c. 1800
  • Katherine Hambridge
  • Introduction to Chapters 5 and 6
  • Operatic practices at the London Opera: Pasticcio to repertory to canon?
  • Michael Burden and Jennifer Hall-Witt
  • Chapter 5.From recycled performances to repertoire at the King's Theatre in London, 1705-1820
  • Michael Burden
  • Chapter 6. Repertory opera and canonic sensibility at the London opera, 1820-1860
  • Jennifer Hall-Witt
  • Introduction to chapters 7 and 8
  • From capital-city opera house to provincial theaters in France
  • Patrick Taieb, Sabine Teulon Lardic and Yannick Simon
  • Chapter 7.The evolution of French opera repertories in provincial theaters: Three epochs, 1770-1900
  • Patrick Taieb and Sabine Teulon Lardic
  • Chapter 8. The mingling of opera genres: Canonic opera at the Theatre des Arts in Rouen, 1882-1897
  • Yannick Simon
  • Introduction to chapters 9 and 10
  • The Italian opera world and its canons
  • Carlotta Sorba and Jutta Toelle
  • Chapter 9. Theaters, markets, and canonic implications in the Italian opera system, 1820-1880
  • Carlotta Sorba
  • Chapter 10.Operatic canons and repertories in Italy around 1900
  • Jutta Toelle
  • Introduction to chapters 11 and 12
  • Opera in the Western Hemisphere, 1811-1910: New York, Buenos Aires, and Montevideo
  • Karen Ahlquist and Benjamin Walton
  • Chapter 11. International opera in nineteenth-century New York: Core repertories and canonic values
  • Karen Ahlquist
  • Chapter 12. Canons of real and imagined opera: Buenos Aires and Montevideo, 1810-1860
  • Benjamin Walton
  • Introduction to chapters 13 and 14
  • Tension between national and cosmopolitan canons in England and Russia
  • William Weber and Rutger Helmers
  • Chapter 13.The survival of English opera in nineteenth-century concert life
  • William Weber
  • Chapter 14.National and international canons of opera in Tsarist Russia
  • Rutger Helmers
  • Part 2. Other views, other canons
  • Introduction to chapters 15 and 16
  • Singers and the operatic canon
  • Kimberley White and Hilary Poriss
  • Chapter 15.Setting the standard: Singers, theater practices, and the operatic canon in nineteenth-century France
  • Kimberley White
  • Chapter 16.Redefining the standard: Pauline Viardot and Gluck's Orphee
  • Hilary Poriss
  • Introduction to chapters 17 and 18
  • Uses of the operatic canon
  • Cormac Newark and Mark Berry
  • Chapter 17. Canons of the Risorgimento then and now
  • Cormac Newark
  • Chapter 18. Blow the opera houses into the air: Wagner, Boulez, and modernist canons
  • Mark Berry
  • Introduction to chapters 19 and 20
  • Re-writing the operatic canon
  • Flora Willson and William Gibbons
  • Chapter 19.Phantoms at the Opera: Meyerbeer and de-canonization
  • Flora Willson
  • Chapter 20. The uses and disadvantages of opera history: Unhistorical thinking in fin-de-siecle Paris
  • William Gibbons
  • Introduction to chapters 21 and 22
  • Contiguous genres: Operetta and American musicals
  • Micaela Baranello and Raymond Knapp
  • Chapter 21. Viennese operetta canon formation and the journey to prestige
  • Micaela Baranello
  • Chapter 22.Canons of the American musical
  • Raymond Knapp
  • Introduction to chapters 23 and 24
  • Twentieth-century reproductive technology and the operatic canon
  • Karen Henson and Hugo Shirley
  • Chapter 23. Sound recording and the operatic canon: Three drops of the needle
  • Karen Henson
  • Chapter 24. Opera on film and the canon
  • Hugo Shirley
  • Introduction to chapters 25 and 26
  • Views of the operatic canon from the industry
  • John Rockwell and Kasper Holten
  • Chapter 25. Critical reflections on the operatic canon
  • John Rockwell
  • Chapter 26. Inside and outside the operatic canon, on stage and in the boardroom
  • Kasper Holten
  • Bibliography
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